Even with the lack of rain and punishing high temperatures the City Council pictorial meadows are still managing to bring interest and colour. These meadows are dotted about the city and provide not only a vital refuge, nectar, pollen and seed source but also help to connect our wildlife areas. To find your nearest one see the City Council website-pictorial meadows or find images at #cammeadows. This image was taken at Ditton fields recreational ground.

The hot weather has added an interesting dynamic to life on the reserves, putting it mildly! Most plants are suffering and life cycles are being put under extreme pressure. Evidence of this will become more apparent next year when the effect on numbers can be observed. The rising temperatures have also dried up some of our ponds. This happened at Bramblefields nature reserve where the original pond became a slightly damp indent rather than a body of water. However this did provide the opportunity to easily remove the…

Brownfield sites are rapidly becoming some of the most valuable environments for many species in the UK. Often the last ‘wild spaces’ left for local communities these sites are unexpected havens for many invertebrates, amphibians, reptiles and plant life. The varying topography and low nutrient soils create perfect micro-climates for basking, nesting and hunting. The Cambridge railway sidings were one such example of a species rich brownfield site. Recently transformed into the Cambridge North station this site was lost. Bramblefields nature reserve in Chesterton is adjacent to the…